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CompactDAQ

1. NI CompactDAQ Hardware

NI CompactDAQ is a small, modular data acquisition system capable of analog I/O, digital I/O, counter/timer operations, industrial bus communication, and sensor and electrical measurements. An NI CompactDAQ system consists of a chassis and NI C Series I/O modules.

1. C Series Modules

Choose from more than 60 NI C Series modules for different measurements including thermocouple, voltage, resistance temperature detector, current, resistance, strain, digital (TTL and other), accelerometer, and microphone. Channel counts on the individual modules range from three to 32 channels to accommodate a wide range of system requirements. C Series modules combine signal conditioning, connectivity, and data acquisition into a small module for each specific measurement type, which reduces system complexity and increases measurement accuracy. Insert these modules into any C Series chassis to create a system that meets your specific application needs. Finally, you can create a mix of channel counts and measurement types within one system by selecting the desired modules and installing them into one of several C Series systems. With NI CompactDAQ, you can build the right system to meet the needs of your measurement application.

Figure 1. Choose from more than 60 NI C Series measurement modules.

NI C Series modules combine A/D converters, signal conditioning, and signal connectivity in one package for measuring or generating one or more specific types of signal. C Series I/O modules are hot-swappable and automatically detected by the NI CompactDAQ chassis. I/O channels are accessible using the NI-DAQmx driver software.

Because the modules contain built-in signal conditioning for extended voltage ranges or industrial signal types, you typically make your wiring connections directly from the C Series I/O modules to your sensors/actuators. In most cases, the C Series I/O modules provide isolation from channel-to-earth ground. Check each module's specifications for more details.

2. Integrated Processor and Storage

NI CompactDAQ controllers further the integration of your data acquisition system by combining the processor and data storage with the data acquisition and signal conditioning in a small, rugged form factor. NI has partnered with Intel to bring the latest industrial processors, such as the dual-core Atom, i7, and Celeron chips, to the data acquisition market.

Learn more about the advantages of using an NI CompactDAQ controller.

3. Mechanical Design

Instrumentation placement and installation are important parts of a test setup. You can minimize surrounding electrical noise by placing instrumentation close to the test subject because the digital signals used by USB, Ethernet, 802.11 WiFi, and several other protocols are less susceptible to electromagnetic interference. NI CompactDAQ can measure many channels in a small, rugged package so that you can place it close to the unit under test. NI CompactDAQ systems offer the following mechanical design features:

Rugged, Versatile Chassis With Flexible Mounting Options

  • Ability to hold 1, 4, or 8 C Series modules 
  • Ability to transfer data over USB, Ethernet, or 802.11 WiFi or choose a stand-alone option with an embedded computer
  • A380 metal construction for durability
  • 30 g shock and 0.3 grms operational vibration in accordance with IEC-60068-2-27/64 for most chassis
  • 50 g shock and 5 g operational vibration in accordance with IEC-60068-2-27/64 for the NI cDAQ-9188XT chassis and cDAQ-9134 controller
  • -20 to 55 °C operational temperature for most chassis
  • -40 to 70 °C operational temperature for the cDAQ-9188XT chassis and cDAQ-9134 controllers
  • Panel mount, rack-mount, DIN-rail mount, and desktop mounting kits
  • 2D and 3D drawings (see Resources tab on model pages)

 

Figure 2. NI CompactDAQ chassis offer 1-, 4-, or 8-slot options.

Cable and Signal Wire Strain Relief for Solid Connections

  • Power connection is attached to chassis with screws and includes a protective back shell for safety
  • USB cable locks to USB chassis with thumbscrew (locking USB cable included in USB chassis kits)
  • Ethernet cable locks with latch mechanism (standard Ethernet cable sold separately)
  • All modules either are shipped with or have available as accessories strain relief covers to prevent wire removal
  • Shock and vibration tests are conducted with power, communication, and module signal wires connected

Built-In Trigger Lines for Import/Export of Digital Clocks

  • 8-slot USB and Ethernet chassis have two BNC connections for trigger lines
  • cDAQ-9132 and cDAQ-9134 controllers include an SMB connector for a trigger
  • Bandwidth to support up to a 1 MHz clock
  • Ability to synchronize multiple systems (system synchronization not compatible with all modules, see chassis manual)

 

Figure 3. Close-up of power input, BNC trigger lines, and locking USB port on the NI cDAQ-9178

Automatic Synchronization of Modules and Channels

  • Additional modules can be plugged in to add more measurement types and channels to the system
  • Modules are hot-swappable and autodetect once you insert them into an NI CompactDAQ chassis
  • A single NI CompactDAQ system can simultaneously stream high-speed analog input, analog output, digital input, and digital output
  • Multiple NI CompactDAQ chassis can be synchronized with the NI 9469 module and RJ-50 cable

Visit the NI CompactDAQ chassis model page for prices and ordering information.

 

NI CompactDAQ USB Chassis

The NI cDAQ-9178 (eight slots), NI cDAQ-9174 (four slots), and NI cDAQ-9171 (one slot) USB chassis are designed for one to eight C Series I/O modules. The chassis are capable of measuring a broad range of analog and digital I/O signals and sensors over a Hi-Speed USB 2.0 interface.

Figure 1. cDAQ-9178 Chassis: (1) USB Connector, (2) TRIG 0 and 1 BNC Connector, (3) USB Cable Strain Relief, (4) 9-30 VDC Power Connector, (5) Module Slots, (6) Installed C Series modules, and (7) Chassis Grounding Screw

Figure 2. cDAQ-9174 Chassis: (1) USB Connector, (2) USB Cable Strain Relief, (3) 9-30 VDC Power Connector, (4) Module Slots, and (5) Chassis Grounding Screw

Figure 3. cDAQ-9171 Chassis: (1) ACTIVE and READY Status LEDs, (2) USB Connector with Strain Relief, (3) Chassis Grounding Screw, (4) Module Slot

NI CompactDAQ Ethernet Chassis

The NI cDAQ-9188/9188XT (eight slots), NI cDAQ-9184 (four slots), and the NI cDAQ-9181 (one slot) Ethernet chassis are designed for one to eight C Series I/O modules. They are capable of measuring a broad range of analog and digital I/O signals and sensors over an IEEE 802.3ab Gigabit Ethernet interface.

Figure 4. cDAQ-9188/9188XT Chassis: (1) Chassis Grounding Screw, (2) Installed C Series Modules, (3) Module Slots, (4) 9-30 VDC Power Connector, (5) Reset Button, (6) PFI 0/1 BNC Connector, and (7) Ethernet Connector

Figure 5. cDAQ-9184 Chassis: (1) Chassis Grounding Screw, (2) Installed C Series Modules, (3) Module Slots, (4) Ethernet Connector, (5) 9-30 VDC Power Connector, (6) Reset Button, and (7) Status LEDs

Figure 6. cDAQ-9181 Chassis: (1) 9-30 VDC Power Connector, (2) Ethernet Connector, 10/100 and LINK/ACT LEDs, (3) Reset Button, (4) POWER, STATUS, and ACTIVE LEDs, (5) Chassis Grounding Screw, (6) Module Slot

NI CompactDAQ Wireless Chassis

The NI cDAQ-9191 (one slot) wireless chassis is designed for one C Series I/O module. It is capable of measuring a broad range of analog and digital I/O signals and sensors over IEEE 802.3ab Gigabit Ethernet interface for a wired connection or IEEE 802.11 Wi-Fi for wireless streaming.

Figure 7. cDAQ-9191 Chassis: (1) Antenna and Antenna Connector, (2) 9-30 VDC Power Connector, (3) Ethernet Connector, 10/100 and LINK/ACT LEDs, (4) Reset Button, (5) POWER, STATUS, and ACTIVE LEDs, (6) Wireless Signal Strength LEDs , (7) Chassis Grounding Screw, (8) Module Slot

 

4. Multiple Timing Engines for Multiple Acquisition Rates

A vital piece of a data acquisition system is the A/D converter. A/D converters need clock signals to designate when to acquire samples. Many systems have multiple A/D converters that share the same clock to synchronize all of the channels’ measurements. NI CompactDAQ systems have the advantage of flexibility when it comes to timing engines and go beyond standard synchronization.

Multiple Timing Engines for Multiple Rates

NI CompactDAQ chassis have three analog input timing engines. This makes it possible for programmers to divide all of their analog inputs in up to three different groups known as tasks.

  • Each task can run at a separate rate, as seen in Figure 3. This is ideal when combining temperature measurements, which are often slow, with higher-speed measurements such as sound and vibration.
  • The three tasks operate independently, can be addressed from separate loops or threads in a program, and can be started simultaneously.
  • All channels within a single task are automatically synchronized. In the event a multiplexed module is combined in a task with a simultaneous sampling module, the first channel in the multiplexed module is synchronized and the subsequent channels in the multiplexed module scan through in succession.
  • All channels within a single task, simultaneous and multiplexed, are returned at the requested sample rate.
  • All modules can be placed in a single task if desired. This synchronizes all channels to the same clock.

Designated Timing Engines for Digital and Analog Output

NI CompactDAQ was designed to perform up to seven tasks simultaneously. You can choose from several task options:

  • Analog input with up to three timing engines
  • Digital input with designated timing engine
  • Digital output with designated timing engine
  • Analog output with designated timing engine
  • Counter/timer tasks for quadrature, PWM, event, period, or frequency measurement (there are four counter/timers built into NI CompactDAQ chassis that you can access through a digital module)

By having a designated resource, digital and analog output tasks can run independently without having to share a clock signal from another task. This makes the programming easier and more intuitive. Designated resources can be shared with other subsystems of the chassis. For example, you can share the digital input clock with the analog output clock to generate a voltage with every rising/falling edge of the digital input.

The multiple timing engines and ability to route and share resources provide a level of flexibility to NI CompactDAQ unequaled by most off-the-shelf data acquisition systems.

Figure 4. This image depicts different analog input tasks running at different rates in the same chassis.

 

5. Advanced Counter Functionality From NI-STC 3 Technology

Some of the core technology in NI CompactDAQ chassis is shared with other NI data acquisition products. This technology is known as the third generation of the system timing controller (NI-STC3). Many devices use off-the-shelf clocks and oscillators for system timing. NI technology is designed for performance from the ground up, starting with the timing engines and 30 years of PC-based instrumentation experience. NI-STC3 technology is proprietary source code that is built into an ASIC and separates systems like NI CompactDAQ from all other devices on the market.

Four Advanced 32-Bit Counter/Timers

  • You can use counters for event counting, quadrature encoder measurement, PWM, pulse train generation, or period or frequency measurement.
  • NI-STC3 counters are advanced because they contain an embedded or onboard auxiliary counter. This is not directly accessible by the user, but it is accessed by the driver for some frequency measurements. These processes normally require two cascaded counters, but with NI-STC3 technology, these advanced counters can do more with fewer resources.
  • You can share resources to synchronize counter tasks to other counter, digital, or analog tasks.

 

Figure 4. Diagram of Counter 0 and Frequency Generator is shown

Built-In Frequency Generator

  • 10 MHz, 20 MHz, and 100 kHz base clocks
  • 16 divisors (n=1..16)
  • Output through an installed hardware-timed digital module or built-in BNC trigger lines (1 MHz bandwidth limit on built-in trigger lines)

Advanced Counter and Digital Features

  • Change detection event
  • Hardware triggering (start, reference, and pause)
  • Programmable function interface (PFI) terminals used for input/output timing signals for analog, digital, or counter functions
  • 8 counter input functions
  • 5 counter output functions

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6. NI Signal Streaming Technology

Communication buses, such as USB, Ethernet, and 802.11 WiFi, have a standardized data structure and a defined method of how a device communicates with the host, but not all devices are created equal. Patented NI Signal Streaming technology sets out to operate NI data acquisition devices most efficiently within the bounds of these bus standards. Many consumer products need only one or two streams of directional data. Music players and storage devices often move large quantities of data in one direction, updating to or from the host PC. Test systems often involve multiple inputs and outputs running simultaneously. NI Signal Streaming enables high-speed, bidirectional data streaming to and from the NI CompactDAQ system.

Figure 5. NI Signal Streaming technology enables parallel streaming of data from multiple tasks with minimal processor involvement.

Read more about NI Signal Streaming technology.

 

7. Software Options with NI CompactDAQ

With NI CompactDAQ systems, you can develop measurement and test applications in multiple programming environments, including ANSI C/C++, Visual C#, and Visual Basic .NET. However, tight hardware and software integration makes the NI LabVIEW graphical development environment the best choice for getting the most performance out of your NI CompactDAQ system with the least programming effort.

LabVIEW is a graphical programming environment for developing sophisticated measurement, test, and control systems using intuitive graphical icons and wires that resemble a flowchart. LabVIEW offers unrivaled integration with thousands of hardware devices, including the NI CompactDAQ platform, and provides hundreds of built-in libraries for advanced analysis and data visualization. You can automate measurements from several devices, analyze data in real time, and create custom reports in just minutes using this industry-standard tool.

Before you begin using your NI CompactDAQ hardware, you must install your application development environment (ADE) and NI-DAQmx driver software. Refer to the Installing NI LabVIEW and NI-DAQmx document for more information.

Figure 6. Graphical programming and dataflow representation make you more productive, enabling you to program just like you think.

 

8. Setting Up NI CompactDAQ Hardware

Complete the following steps to prepare your CompactDAQ chassis for use:

  1. Install your application development environment (ADE) and NI-DAQmx software if you have not done so already. See Installing NI LabVIEW and NI-DAQmx for more information.
  2. Make sure the CompactDAQ Chassis power source is not connected.
  3. Attach a ring lug to a 14 AWG (1.6 mm) wire. Connect the ring lug to the ground terminal on the side of the chassis using the ground screw. Attach the other end of the wire to the system safety ground as shown in Figure 14.

Figure 14. Ring Lug Attached to Chassis Ground

  1. Insert each C Series I/O module by squeezing both module latches, placing the I/O module into an empty module slot, and pressing until both latches lock the module in place.

Figure 15. Installing C Series I/O Modules: (1) USB or Ethernet Connector and (2) C Series I/O Module

  1. Attach a wire with a ring lug to all other C Series I/O module cable shields. You must connect this wire to the ground terminal of the chassis using the ground screw.
  2. Connect the NI CompactDAQ chassis to your host computer. Connect a NI cDAQ-9178/9174/9171 chassis with the supplied USB cable to any available USB port on your computer. Use the jackscrew on the locking USB cable to securely attach the cable to the chassis.
  3. Use a shielded CAT 5E Ethernet cable to connect a NI cDAQ-9181/9184/9188/9188XT/9191 chassis to your network. You can connect NI CompactDAQ Ethernet or wireless chassis directly to your host computer, to a local router or switch, to a corporate or enterprise network, or to a dedicated, secondary network interface card (NIC).

Figure 16. Network Configurations for NI CompactDAQ Ethernet Chassis

  1. Connect the supplied power source to the NI CompactDAQ chassis. The Power LED indicates whether the NI CompactDAQ Chassis is receiving power. When in use, it is normal for the chassis to become warm to the touch.

 

Configuring NI-DAQmx for NI CompactDAQ USB Chassis

Complete the following steps to configure your NI-DAQmx software for use with NI CompactDAQ USB chassis:

  1. Check that the Ready LED is lit. This lights when the computer recognizes a NI CompactDAQ USB Chassis. The color indicates whether the USB connection is Full-Speed (green) or Hi-Speed (amber).
  2. Install the software automatically as recommended for each device if the Found New Hardware Wizard opens.
  3. Ensure that the NI Device Monitor is running. After Windows detects newly installed NI USB devices, it should run automatically. If it does not run, unplug your device, restart NI Device Monitor by selecting Start»All Programs»National Instruments»NI-DAQ»NI Device Monitor, and plug in your device. The NI Device Monitor prompts you to select from a list of options. These options may vary, depending on the devices and software installed on your system.

Figure 17. NI Device Monitor

  1. Click Configure and Test This Device to open NI MAX
  2. Expand Devices and Interfaces to confirm your NI cDAQ-9171/9174/9178 chassis is listed. You should also see your C Series I/O modules listed beneath the chassis. If your devices do not appear, press to refresh the view in MAX.

Figure 18. NI MAX

  1. Right-click the device and select Self-Test. When the self-test finishes, a message indicates successful verification or if an error occurred.

Figure 19. Self-Test

Configuring NI-DAQmx for NI CompactDAQ Ethernet Chassis

Complete the following steps to configure your NI-DAQmx software for use with NI CompactDAQ Ethernet chassis:

If your Network DAQ device is not listed, right-click Network Devices, and select Find Network NI-DAQmx Devices. In the Add Device Manually field, type the hostname or IP address of the Network DAQ device, click the + button, and click Add Selected Devices. Or if your chassis is automatically detected on the network, it will appear under the Available Devices section. Select this device and click Add Selected Devices. Your device will be added under Devices and Interfaces»Network Devices.

  1. Double-click the MAX icon on the desktop.
  2. Expand Devices and Interfaces to confirm your device is detected. If the chassis is listed under Devices and Interfaces»Network Devices, right-click it and select Add Device.

Figure 20. Find Network NI-DAQmx Devices

If you still cannot access your NI cDAQ-9181/9184/9188/9188XT chassis, select the “Click here for troubleshooting tips if your device does not appear” link in the Find Network NI-DAQmx Devices window or view additional troubleshooting resources.

  1. If the cDAQ-9181/9184/9188/9188XT chassis is already in use by another host computer on the same network, you cannot run any measurement tasks on the chassis. To reserve the chassis for use with your host computer, you must right-click it and select Reserve Chassis. This terminates any tasks being run by another host machine.
  2. If your DHCP server is set up to automatically register hostnames, the chassis registers the hostname as cDAQ-. You can find the serial number on the back of the chassis.
  3. Select the Network Settings tab. Select Static, DHCP or Link Local, Link Local Only, or DHCP Only for the IP address of the chassis. Click Save to confirm your settings.

Figure 21. IP Address Settings

  1. If you selected DHCP or Link Local, then the IP Address, Subnet Mask, Gateway, and DNS Server fields should automatically populated after you save your settings. Otherwise, ask your network administrator for the correct settings.
  2. Check that your C Series I/O modules are listed beneath the chassis. It may take up to 30 seconds for your host computer to discover all the modules, depending on the speed of your network.

Figure 22. System Settings in NI MAX

  1. Right-click the device and select Self-Test. When the self-test finishes, a message indicates successful verification or if an error occurred.

Figure 23. Self-Test

 

Configuring NI-DAQMX for NI CompactDAQ Wireless Chassis

Complete the following steps to configure your NI-DAQmx software for use with NI CompactDAQ Wireless Chassis:

  1. Double-click the MAX icon on the desktop.
  2. Expand Devices and Interfaces to confirm your device is detected. If the chassis is listed under Devices and Interfaces»Network Devices, right-click it and select Add Device.
    If your Network DAQ device is not listed, right-click Network Devices, and select Find Network NI-DAQmx Devices. In the Add Device Manually field, type the hostname or IP address of the Network DAQ device, click the + button, and click Add Selected Devices. Or if your chassis is automatically detected on the network, it will appear under the Available Devices section. Select this device and click Add Selected Devices.

Figure 24. Find Network NI-DAQmx Devices

  1. Your device should now be added under Devices and Interfaces»Network Devices with a identified IP Address for Ethernet.

Figure 25. System Settings in NI MAX

If you still cannot access your NI cDAQ-9181/9184/9188/9188XT chassis, select the “Click here for troubleshooting tips if your device does not appear” link in the Find Network NI-DAQmx Devices window or view additional troubleshooting resources.

  1. To enable wireless operation of the NI cDAQ-9191, on the Network Settings tab, select your country.

Figure 26. Selecting Country for Wireless

  1. Once the correct country is selected, enable wireless mode by selecting Connect to a wireless network or Create wireless network. For a wireless network, select a network from the scanned list or select Other Network and enter settings. Click Save.

Figure 27. Configuring Wireless Mode

  1. On the System Settings tab, verify that the chassis has a wireless IP and the System State reads Connected-Running. You should notice that the chassis now has an IP address for both Ethernet and wireless.

Figure 28. System Settings in NI MAX With Ethernet and Wireless Mode Enabled

  1. Make sure your PC connected to a network that can access the chassis at its wireless IP address and then disconnect the Ethernet cable from the chassis. Click Refresh. Verify that the Ethernet IP address is 0.0.0.0 and the wireless IP address remains unchanged from step 6.

Figure 29. System Settings in NI MAX with Wireless Mode Enabled

  1. Right-click the device and select Self-Test. When the self-test finishes, a message indicates successful verification or if an error occurred.

Figure 30. Self-Test

 

Configuring NI CompactDAQ Ethernet or Wireless Chassis Through a Web Browser

As an alternative to MAX, the cDAQ-9184/9188/9188XT/9191 chassis hosts a Web server from which you can configure network, security, firmware, and other system settings. Complete the following steps to configure your NI CompactDAQ Ethernet or wireless chassis through a Web browser:

Alternatively, you can use the NI Network Browser (located in the National Instruments start menu folder on your host computer) to find chassis on your local subnet.

  1. Install Microsoft Silverlight on your host computer for free fromwww.microsoft.com/getsilverlight.
  2. Open a Web browser (Internet Explorer, Mozilla Firefox, or Google Chrome), and enter the IP address of the cDAQ-9184/9188/9188XT/9191 chassis into the address bar and hit Enter.

Figure 31. Web-Based Configuration and Monitoring

  1. View the icons on the left side of the screen. These represent System Settings, Security Settings, Network Settings, and Update Firmware. Each corresponds to the tabs in MAX. The default login for the security page is “admin” with no password.
  2. Click the Help button at the top of each page for detailed instructions.
  3. Click Save on each page before selecting another icon. Each save requires the chassis to reboot, which can take up to 30 seconds.
  4. Click View Other Devices to configure other NI networked-based hardware on the same subnet as the cDAQ-9184/9188/9188XT/9191 chassis

Mounting NI CompactDAQ Hardware

You can mount an NI CompactDAQ Chassis using a desktop mounting kit, 35 mm DIN rail mounting kit, or panel mount accessory kit.

NI 9901 Desktop Mounting Kit

The NI 9901 desktop mounting kit includes two metal feet you can install on the sides of the NI CompactDAQ Chassis for desktop use. With this kit, you can tilt the NI CompactDAQ Chassis for convenient access to the I/O module connectors. When you install the two metal feet, the two existing screws on the back side and I/O end of the chassis must be removed, as shown in Figure 6. After removing the screws, replace them with the two longer screws included in the NI 9901 desktop mounting kit. The NI 9901 desktop mounting kit can be used with the following NI CompactDAQ Chassis:

  • NI cDAQ-9174, cDAQ-9178
  • NI cDAQ-9184, cDAQ-9188, cDAQ-9188XT

Figure 9. NI 9901 Desktop Mounting Kit

 

DIN-Rail Mounting Kits

Each DIN-rail kit contains one clip for mounting the chassis on a standard 35 mm DIN rail. To mount the chassis on a DIN rail, fasten the DIN-rail clip to the chassis using a No. 2 Phillips screwdriver and two M4 X 17 screws. The screws are included in the DIN-rail kit. Make sure the DIN-rail kit is installed as illustrated in Figure 7, with the larger lip of the DIN rail positioned up. When the DIN-rail kit is properly installed, the CompactDAQ chassis is centered on the DIN rail. Use the following kits for each chassis:

  • NI 9915 DIN-Rail Kit for cDAQ-9178 and cDAQ-9188/9188XT
  • NI 9912 DIN-Rail Kit for cDAQ-9174 and cDAQ-9184
  • NI 9913 DIN-Rail Kit for cDAQ-9181 and cDAQ-9191

Figure 10. DIN-Rail Installation on cDAQ-9178 or cDAQ-9188/9188XT

Figure 11. DIN-Rail Installation on cDAQ-9181 or cDAQ-9191

Panel Mount Kits

To mount the chassis on a panel, align the chassis on the panel mount accessory. Attach the chassis to the panel mount kit using two M4 X 17 screws. National Instruments provides these screws with the panel mount kit. You must use these screws because they are the correct depth and thread for the panel. These slots in the panel mount kit can be used with M4, M5, No. 8, or No.10 panhead screws. Figure 8 illustrates the panel dimensions and installation on the CompactDAQ chassis. Refer to the documentation included with the panel mount kit for more detailed dimensions. Use the following kits for each chassis:

  • NI 9905 Panel Mount Kit for cDAQ-9178 or cDAQ-9188/9188XT
  • NI 9904 Panel Mount Kit for the NI cDAQ-9174 and cDAQ-9184
  • NI 9903 Panel Mount Kit for the NI cDAQ-9181and cDAQ-9191

Figure 12. Panel Mount Installation on cDAQ-9178 or cDAQ-9188/9188XT

Figure 13. Panel Mount Installation on cDAQ-9181 or cDAQ-9191

For the cDAQ-9171 chassis, you do not need a kit for panel mounting. Two keyholes are located on the NI cDAQ-9171 for mounting it to a panel or wall. You can panel mount the NI cDAQ-9171 with either #6-32 panhead machine screws or M3.5 panhead machine screws. Installed screw height for both screw types is 7.37 mm (0.29 in.). Refer to the NI cDAQ-9171 Specifications for mounting dimensions.